How Are You NOT for Women?

By Audrea Taylor, President of im2moro (Guest Writer)

I remember the look on my professor’s face when she asked, “How are you not for women?” The question was the culmination of a forty-five minute heated discussion we had in front of the class a few days before, and another forty-five minute or so conversation we had sitting in the middle of a busy Starbucks with college students buzzing around us.

My professor had asked me to coffee after our classroom exchange. She was one of the most loved professors on my small Christian college campus. She was young, charming, smart and had a deep love for students. The discussion we had was about women’s rights. We had disagreed on what “women’s rights” actually meant.

Fast forward to just this past week in Washington D.C – I thought back to this conversation I had with my professor as I sat next to a group of women who had traveled from Austin, Texas, not to attend the Inauguration, but to join the Women’s March protest that would take place the next day.

I knew why I had spent valuable resources, time and money, to make the trip to Washington.

I was in D.C. for the historic Inauguration of the 45th president of the United States – to witness the founder’s grand experiment performed for the 45th time in American history with a new president.

Ronald Reagan said in his 1981 Inauguration Address, “To a few of us here today this is a solemn and most momentous occasion, and yet in the history of our nation it is a commonplace occurrence. The orderly transfer of authority as called for in the Constitution routinely takes place, as it has for almost two centuries, and few of us stop to think how unique we really are. In the eyes of many in the world, this every-four-year ceremony we accept as normal is nothing less than a miracle.”

President Reagan spelled it out – the transfer of power is something special and unique. I wanted to see it happen.

But why had these ladies traveled to D.C.? I know, for the women’s march – but really why had they come? What rights were they deprived of? What rights did they desire?

When you ask people who supported or attended the women’s march this question, you will receive a variety of answers. But I believe there was really only one right they gathered to defend – the right to an abortion.

Ironically, this is a right they already have based on the Supreme Court decision, Roe vs. Wade. But it’s a right they are afraid of losing under a new administration.

You see, the march was not about promoting women, feminism, respect or equality. Many Christian women tried to join the march but were removed from the sponsor list because they believe in the rights of baby girls in the womb. Instead the march was about an ideology that does not value life. It was a platform for planned parenthood’s biggest supporters to publicly display their hate (Madonna saying she thought about “blowing up the White House”) and it was about planned parenthood telling the world they are frightened their business empire based on terminating life will come crashing down when congress defunds them and the Supreme Court upholds a different ideology.

As I sat next to these ladies from Austin who had traveled to Washington D.C. it hit me – I do not believe these hundreds of thousands of women who marched around the country and the world truly understand what is at stake. Edifying a culture of death over life…the damage will stifle generations from now.

I remember explaining to my professor my beliefs on women’s rights – she looked at me genuinely puzzled and asked, “How are you not for women?” I laughed and said, “How could I not be for myself? I’m all for women.” But contemplating her statement in D.C. this past week, a couple years now since I sat in that Starbucks with her, I’m reminded why she said it.

For so long there has only been one side presented in the “women rights narrative.” There have been a few bold women who have dared to swim upstream against this rushing current, Lila Rose for example. But overall, my generation, the women in the millennial generation have bought in to the propaganda on their university campuses and they are perplexed and shocked as my professor was – how a woman can be both pro-life and pro-women?

I truly believe we are at a crossroads in America today. The millennial generation is deciding what they will believe. You could feel the divide in the city of D.C. – those who believed in life and those who gathered for abortion rights.

I want to remind us, we can win on the issue of life for the next four years, as Vice President Pence said, “Life is winning in America.” Yet, if we do not win the narrative with the next generation, we lose the war for our nation’s soul. As quickly as President Trump and Republicans are changing policies to defend life – a new political cycle can reverse the progress.

The pro-abortion advocates know the millennial generation is their key. Obama said this in his Presidential farewell address, “This generation coming up — unselfish, altruistic, creative, patriotic — I’ve seen you in every corner of the country.” He continued to say, “You’ll soon outnumber any of us, and I believe as a result that the future is in good hands.”

Reagan understood the importance of reaching the next generation when he said his now famous words, “freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction.”

We will truly win on the issue of life when we begin to win the narrative and effectively explain how we are actually for women. Political victories are sweet, but let’s not forget the difficult work that lies ahead. Reaching and engaging the hearts of the largest generation in American history – millennials.

Andrea Taylor is a featured Texas Eagle Forum Speaker – see her bio and information here.

Do you like what you are reading? Help Texas Eagle Forum create a grassroots army of activists who care about life and women.





Leave a Reply

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>